George’s Favorite Books of 2020

George’s Favorite Books of 2020

Each year, there are more and more Disney- and theme park-related books published. As a theme park nerd, this makes me very happy, but it also means there’s a lot of wheat to separate from the chaff. And that’s part of why ImagiNERDing exists; I always want to present a fair and unbiased look at Disney and theme park books.

With the ease of self-publishing, it means that everyone can tell their theme park story or create their own Disney book. This is a double-edged sword: not only do we get an enormous amount of material, but it also means that quality control (editing, proof-reading, copy-editing, design, etc.) is often neglected. Regardless of the content, grammar, spelling, and style are all important and are a big part of whether a book makes my list.

Books, Books, and More Books from 2020

What follows is the list of my favorite books from the past year in chronological release date.

  • Rolling Through the Years: a Cedar Point Atlas & Chronology by Ken Miller—This is the ultimate history of Cedar Point and might be one of the greatest amusement park books ever written. It’s a huge book and is the most comprehensively detailed book about Cedar Point. And I always recommend that Disney park fans spend time visiting regional parks, like Cedar Point, because they offer a look into the growth and development of themed entertainment.

  • The Disney Monorail: Imagineering a Highway in the Sky by Jeff Kurtti, Vanessa Hunt, and Paul Wolski—talk about the ultimate release for fans of Walt Disney and the history of the monorail! The book takes us on a trip through the different iterations of the monorail through history (no, Disney did not invent the monorail) and the development of monorails at Disney parks. Every Disney fan needs to own this!

  • Holiday Magic at the Disney Parks: Celebrations Around the World from Fall to Winter by Graham Allen, Rebecca Cline, and Charlie Price—this is a book that Disney fans have been waiting years for. It’s a massive book that looks at all the how the holidays are celebrated in all of parks, resorts, hotels, and cruise ships. There is a smattering of history, which is nice, but the majority of the 1900 photos are from the past few years. This is an important release, especially concerning the lack of celebrations happening in the parks in 2020 and for the many fans that aren’t able to travel. I enjoyed the book, mainly for the photos, but really with there had been more of a vogue on the history of the holidays in the parks.

  • Polishing the Dragons: Making EPCOT’s “Wonders of China” by Jeff Blythe—Polishing the Dragons is a perfect example of how small and independent publishing houses can offer incredible content that is well-written, well-designed, and, fortunately, well-edited! Disney fans will relish every sentence and they will devour Jeff’s book about the making of the Circle-Vision film. Seriously, I’m still amazed that there is a whole book dedicated to one subject. The book is awesome.

  • Boundless Realm: Deep Explorations Inside Disney’s Haunted Mansion by Foxx Nolte—I’ve known Foxx for more than ten years and her blog has been one of the main inspirations for what I do at ImagiNERDing. The Haunted Mansion is a fan favorite and the attraction has been plagued by a lack of a stated backstory. Foxx takes us very deep to explore all of the influences of the Imagineers that led them to make the spooky house on the hill. This book is amazing and deserves to be in every Disney and theme park fan’s collection.

Haven’t Quite Finished It Yet…

My Favorite Books of 2020?

There you have it: my favorite books from 2020. I’m often asked what my favorite book of the year is, and I’ve offered the ImagiNERDing Book of the Year in years past. But this year, there are so many books that deserve the title that I can’t make an effective choice. If you’re on a limited budget, the Disney Monorails, Polishing the Dragons, Imagineering an American Dreamscape, and Boundless Realm, are all fantastic titles that shed light into Disney history from vastly different points-of-view and offer a wonderful reading experience.

What Are Your Favorite Books from 2020?


FTC Disclosure: In some cases, a copy might have been provided by the company for the purpose of review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Disney Monorail Book Preview!

The Disney Monorail: Imagineering a Highway in the Sky Video Book Preview!

¡Por favor manténgase alejado de las puertas!

Love Disney monorails? Then you need to check out this book preview of The Disney Monorail: Imagineering a Highway in the Sky by Jeff Kurtti, Vanessa Hunt, and Paul Wolski. The review copy just showed up and I set up the video camera to give my fellow ImagiNERDs a first look at this highly-anticipated new Disney book.

Is this going to be the ImagiNERDing Book of the Year?

Check Out My Video Preview of the New Book About Disney Monorails

Make sure to check out these other books by Disney historian, scholar, and all-around great guy: Jeff Kurtti.

Vanessa Hunt has contributed to the Disney Parks literature, as well!

Are you going to pick up the new Disney Monorail book?


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the company for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Vacation Kingdom of the World Takes Shape in Florida

Vacation Kingdom of the World Takes Shape in Florida

The Disney News from the Spring of 1971 offers an interesting article on the construction and development of Walt Disney World. Remember, this is still about six to eight months before the opening of the Vacation Kingdom of the World. Let’s check out how Disney updated Magic Kingdom Club Families, who would be some of the most ardent Disney fans of the time.

It won’t be long now. With approximately 4,000 construction workers on the job, all aspects of Walt Disney World’s 2,500-acre Phase I project are moving steadily toward scheduled completion next October.

The “Voyager” Six these steam-powered launches will be used to transport guests around the lagoon area.

Currently the nation’s largest non-governmental construction project, the new destination vacation resort, located 15 miles southwest of Orlando, is being built at the northern extreme of the 27,400-acre Disney property. It will include a theme park similar to Disneyland, a 650-acre lake and lagoon area, resort hotels, camping facilities, and an almost limitless variety of land and water-oriented recreation facilities.

Construction continues on the beamway that will play an important role in the Walt Disney World transportation network.

First among the new “Magic Kingdom’s” six lands to show signs of its finished shape is romantic Main Street, U.S.A. The architectural overcoat of a bygone era is now being applied to cover the structural skeletons of modern buildings. Ornate cupolas are being framed, gracefully curved windows are being set into place, and the look of the past is coming to life again. The Main Street train station is farthest along, with City Hall, Bank, and Fire Station not far behind. The intriguing facades of the Main Street Cinema, Emporium, Penny Arcade, old-fashioned Ice Cream Parlor, and other landmarks are also beginning to take shape.

At the entrance to Fantasyland, construction on the curving battlements of Cinderella’s Castle has passed the 125-foot mark. (The magnificent spires of the castle will soar to an ultimate height of 180 feet.) And thousands of steel beams are in place — no two pieces alike — supporting reinforced concrete floors and walls. (Movie set-builders have covered the walls with a “makeup” so real that they will look exactly like granite.)

Instead of dungeons beneath the castle, workmen have completed service tunnels and storage facilities providing underground connections to many parts of the “Magic Kingdom.”

In Fantasyland itself, the building to house “It’s A Small World” is near completion, and in Liberty Square, the exterior of the Haunted Mansion is complete.

At Walt Disney World, the Haunted Mansion takes on an entirely Eastern look. Instead of a “Gone-With-The- Wind” flavor, complete with stately white columns, magnolias, and iron- laced balconies, the Florida mansion features architecture of the “early-Edgar Allan Poe” variety — a building made of granite, a dagger-shaped belfry, and a gargoyled doorway that looks like the entrance to a massive tomb.

Adventureland’s Jungle Cruise river channels have been excavated, and many tropical trees and shrubs (among 55,000 that will eventually be transplanted from the Horticultural Center throughout Walt Disney World) are now in place.

In Frontierland, work continues on the setting for the “Country Bear Band,” a foot-stompin’, country and western hoedown featuring the zaniest group of bears ever assembled.

The male members of the cast include: the master of ceremonies, a seven-foot tall bear that wears a beaver hat and talks with a drawl; a five-bear string band; Comer and his rinky-tink piano; Big Al and his un-strung guitar; and the grizzly singing voices of Wendell, Ernest, Terrence, and old Liverlips McCraw.

Among feminine performers, the cast includes: the original swinger, Teddi Bara; the lonesome loser, Trixie; and three little golden-haired bears in blue.

And, for a change of pace, the program features a trio of horn-tooting fugitives from a taxidermist: an elk, a buck, and a moose.

As far as the Walt Disney World Navy is concerned, more than 200 ships and other watercraft are beginning to move down the shipyard ways in Florida.

Ranging from paddlewheel steam-boats to replicas of Captain Nemo’s submarines, the vessels will play important roles, both in the theme park and in the transportation network linking Walt Disney World’s five major resort hotels with the Park.

Work continues on 12 adventure-seeking submarines patterned after assembled at the Martin Marietta Captain Nemo’s vessel in Walt plant in Orlando, are 171-feet long, Disney’s “20,000 Leagues Under The Sea.” Carrying 36 passengers each, they will tour a vast underwater world to view lost continents and ocean marvels.

In addition to water craft, a new monorail system is being built for the Walt Disney World transportation network. Carrying up to 7,700 passengers an hour, the system enables guests to travel from the parking area and transportation center to the theme park or to the major theme resort hotels nearby.

The new Walt Disney World Mark IV monorail trains, which are being assembled at the Martin Marietta plant in Orlando are 171-feet long, wider than their Disneyland counterparts, and incorporate a new air-suspension system for the smoothest ride possible. They are designed to attain speeds up to 45 miles an hour.

The silent, all-electric trains, which travel atop concrete beamways soaring up to 60 feet above ground level, are fully air-conditioned, operational in either direction, and boardable from either side.

In the area of food, a whole new world of dining experiences is being prepared for Walt Disney World guests.

Each of the six major lands in the theme park — Adventureland, Main Street, U.S.A., Frontierland, Fantasy- land, Liberty Square, and Tomorrowland — will have refreshment and themed eating facilities. At the resort hotels, foods from many lands and cultures around the world will be featured in dining rooms, nightclubs, and lounges. And, on romantic steamboats, in picnic areas, on golf courses, and at other recreation sites, unusual eating services will become part of the fun.

According to Food Service Division Director Jim Armstrong, Walt Disney World will be prepared to serve up to 175,000 meals a day. According to John Cardone, Manager of Food Production at the “Magic Kingdom” theme park, “Walt Disney World will serve the largest variety of foods anywhere in the world, everything from French pancakes to Polynesian ‘carry- away’ lunches.”

Variety is the key word in the entertainment area, too. By opening day, the “Vacation Kingdom” will need at least 350 entertainers, including singers, actors, pageant helpers, and production personnel. Bob Jani, Entertainment Director for both Disneyland and Walt Disney World, is already beginning to recruit production crews and initiate training programs.

In the “Magic Kingdom” theme park, both “atmospheric” entertainment and special shows will fill each of the six major lands. For example, on Main Street, U.S.A., a barber-shop quartet and the 20-piece “Magic Kingdom” Marching Band will be featured; in Fantasyland, a Black Forest Tuba Band, an English Pearly Band, court jesters, and the famous Disney characters; in Tomorrowland, rock music; in Liberty Square, fife and drum parades; in Frontierland, entertainment with a western flavor; and in Adventureland, steel drum bands.

In addition, famous entertainers will appear regularly in such locations as the Celebrity Lounge atop the 14- story Contemporary Resort Hotel, and other entertainment locations in the hotels will feature top musical groups and personalities, as well as talent developed by the Disney organization.

Beyond the perimeter of the theme park, construction work is underway for the Contemporary Resort and Polynesian Village hotels, two of five major theme resort hotels to be located in Walt Disney World.

Located on the south shore of the “Vacation Kingdom’s” 200-acre lagoon, the Polynesian Village will offer an informal, leisure way of vacation living in keeping with the romantic South Seas mood it creates.

At night, it will take on a special magic with dining, dancing, and entertainment, all keyed to the South Pacific theme. Luaus under the stars or moonlight excursions on the lagoon will be a part of the total experience for each guest.

The main dining, shopping, and lobby areas will be in the Great House, resembling a royal Tahitian assembly lodge, with “open” peaked roof and brown-skinned rafters reaching through the swaying palms of a central atrium.

Glass walls will give an open feeling to the main dining room, as guests look out over cascading waterfalls and garden lagoons shaped like huge pearl shells.

The contemporary-styled hotel, unlike any building in the world, resembles a long, hollow pyramid. Its sloping walls rise like the lower half of a giant “A” toward a 1 4th floor penthouse restaurant and lounge.

Within its pyramidic hollow, the huge central concourse — nine stories high and one-third longer than a football field — will become a park-like landscape of the Grand Canyon and Monument Valley.

Colors will range from the cool blues and greens of the canyon floor, rising through sandy reds and oranges, to the heights in lighter yellows and golds.

Sunlight will stream through bronzed-glass end walls and skylights, pass by a magnificent tile mural 90 feet high, and reflect off the pools, fountains, sculptured shapes and walkways that wind past simulated open-air shops and restaurants.

Restaurants, shopping areas, and lounges within the concourse mall will be defined, not by walls and partitions, but by light, shadow, color, raised and lowered floor levels, and suspended space forms.

Two of Walt Disney World’s proposed three golf courses have been planted and will be ready for challengers on opening day. Fairway, tee, and green sites have been cleared, and thousands of large palm trees and magnolia trees have been planted on the two courses, in keeping with their names — the Palm and the Magnolia golf courses.

Sparkling white sand traps, jewel-like lakes, winding creek-like canals, and lush, wooded groves have been used in many different ways to challenge golfers.
According to Joseph L. Lee, one of the nation’s foremost golf course architects, “Each golfer will find varying degrees of skill required, de- pending on how he chooses to play.

But each hole is designed to provide a mental challenge for everyone from beginners to professionals.” The Palm Course will be a 6,410-yard par 72 layout; the Magnolia Course will be a 6,550-yard par 72 layout; and the third course will be a 6,500-yard par 72 layout. (Unusually large tees will allow greenskeepers to extend each of the courses to more than 7,000 yards for tournament play.)

Conservation is also playing a major role at the “Vacation Kingdom”. More than 7,000 acres of Walt Disney World have been set aside by the Disney organization for permanent protection as a Conservation Area.

One of the major objectives of the Disney organization in establishing the Area is to demonstrate that with imaginative planning and use of available technology, urbanized development can be achieved without causing deterioration of the environment or disturbing the ecological balance of adjacent areas.

To these ends, extensive water level control facilities have been constructed so that environmental factors can be maintained for optimum benefit to the flora and fauna of the area.

The most advanced methods of water and air pollution controls have been initiated, including the use of natural gas in virtually all vehicles and in the project’s central energy plant, automated trash disposal, and three-stage sewage treatment system to obtain a virtually pure effluent. This effluent, in turn, will be used for irrigation of the golf courses.

Hundreds of thousands of new plants, trees, and shrubs have been imported to help in beautifying the developed areas, while leaving untouched those natural primitive areas which will be protected from human encroachment. Truly, there is no destination-resort today quite like Walt Disney World will be tomorrow. And tomorrow is less than a year away.


Looking for a great book on the first few years of Walt Disney World?

FTC Disclosure: In some cases, a copy might have been provided by the company for the purpose of this review (but not on this post). This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

More Vintage Magic Kingdom Photos from 1973!

More Vintage Magic Kingdom Photos from January 1973!

We’ve got more vintage Magic Kingdom photos from Trevor’s grandparents! They took another trip a year later and we have a few more photos to share from that trip. Check out the photos from 1972, here!

Waiting in the queue for the Skyway to Tomorrowland is Robert Marowske. I wonder if that’s one of the GAF Walt Disney World Information Guides he’s got folded in his hand? I do love the shot of the lamppost and the facade of the it’s a small world building in the background. Also, you might need to shield your eyes from the pants of the gentleman to the left.

Here’s Corliss Marowske and I’m pretty sure she’s standing in the queue for the Swiss Family Treehouse. I love the bag she’s got. Any ideas on the background buildings? I think the buildings are to the left of the Frontierland Breezeway. (The shops in 1973 for Adventureland: Adventureland Bazaar, Tiki Tropic Shop, The Magic Carpet, Oriental Imports, Ltd., Tropic Toppers and Traders of Timbuktu—but the Traders of Timbuktu had a different facade.)

Even blurry images of Walt Disney World from the 1970s are fantastic. We’re near the Liberty Tree with the Liberty Tree Inn standing proudly in the background.

Our last shot is from the Contemporary Resort! It’s one of the sleek and futuristic Mark IV Monorails. She’s a real beauty.

Again, a special thanks to Trevor Clor for submitting these fantastic vintage Magic Kingdom photos from his grandparents, Robert and Corliss Marowske.

Do you have more vintage Magic Kingdom photos that you could share?


Looking for a great book on the first few years of the Magic Kingdom and Walt Disney World? Check out the Story of Walt Disney World: Commemorative Edition. There are some amazing vintage Magic Kingdom photos in the book!

More Carowinds Attraction Tombstones

Carowinds Attraction Tombstones

I looked at a few of the tombstones that honor extinct attractions, here. Let’s take a look at a few more!

Carowinds Attraction Tombstones: Monorail 1973-1994

So, you didn’t know that Carowinds had a monorail? Check out the photo below from the Harmony House restaurant.

The Carowinds Monorail was a two mile attraction that opened on June 2, 1973. It was intended to connect to a hotel, called the Carolina Center, that was never built. The single station was located above the Speedway in the Contemporary Carolinas area. It was a single-beam train that went about 18 miles and hour. It was sold to a resort in Acapulco, Mexico, but never assembled.

Carowinds Attraction Tombstones: Old Jalopies-1973-1987

The Old Jalopies were called the Hillbilly Jalopies and were presented by Exxon. They were in the Carolina Crossroads section of the park, where Whitewater Rapids is now.

Carowinds Attraction Tombstones: Plantation House

The Plantation House, which had been the North Entrance since the park’s opening, stood as the symbol for Carowinds. Sadly, when security gates were added, it lost a lot of it’s visual appeal. Although I miss the charm of the Plantation House, the new entryway offers so many more services and a larger area for entrance and exit. Plus, it offers more of a view into the park; although, going through the Plantation House did give you a bit of a dramatic reveal, much like going under the train tracks at Disneyland and the Magic Kingdom.

Carowinds Attraction Tombstones: Whirling Dervish 1979-2001

The Whirling Dervish was a swing-style ride that was moved to Great America in Santa Clara, CA. in 2001. The spot, in the County Fair section, is now occupied by a another swing ride, called Yo Yo.

Carowinds Attraction Tombstones: White Lightnin’ 1977-1988

White Lightnin’ was a shuttle loop coaster built in 1977. Riders were catapulted along a straight track and then through a vertical loop. After the loop, they went up a 130 foot hill. Then they would go through backwards. It was in the Country Crossroads section of the park.  It was sold to Gold Reef City in South Africa.

Carowinds Attraction Tombstones: Wild Bull 1979-1998

The Wild Bull was in the Country Fair section of the park and sat where After Burn is, currently. It’s known as a Bayen Kurve, and it pretty much a semi-circular bobsled attraction found at many fairs.

Carowinds Attraction Tombstones: Thunder Road 1976-2015

I was very surprised to see a tombstone for Thunder Road, and to see that it was near where the iconic roller coaster once stood. On either side of the tombstone are two plaques that discuss the history of the coaster.

Notice anything interesting about the tombstone?

Yep, it’s made from parts of the roller coaster!

The top has a reproduction of the sign that stood over the entrance.

The face of the tombstone is actually the back of the seat! The epitaph reads:

Thunder Road
Although we had our ups and downs
We traveled great lengths together
Now silver and blue
Are No longer around
But our memories will last forever

At the base of the tombstone are part from the track.

I’m really glad to see Carowinds honor its past, even in such a temporary fashion. There are some great historical photos in the Harmony Hall and I urge you to check them out on your next visit.

Do you have an extinct Carowinds ride that you really miss?


Vintage Walt Disney World Topiary Postcard

There’s so much that I love about this postcard!

Strolling Topiary Lane Vintage Walt Disney World Postcard

Dumbo meets a “topiary cousin,” one of many shrubs grown into the shapes of Disney characters along beautiful Topiary Lane. Nearby, sleek monorail trains glide by on the “highway in the sky,” taking guests on a scenic journey to the Magic Kingdom.

 

 

Where the stamp is located is the number 01110289.

Do you remember Topiary Lane?


 

 

Monorail and Hotel Launches at Walt Disney World

I love running across strange little tidbits of information while doing research for various projects. Eyes and Ears, the cast member newsletter of Walt Disney World, had a section entitled Around the World, which featured a glimpse at different cast members and their specific jobs. The March 03, 1973 edition offers a glimpse at two different positions: a monorail driver and a resort launch hostess.

Continue reading Monorail and Hotel Launches at Walt Disney World

WYWHW: Monorail Postcard at Walt Disney World

Wish You Were Here Wednesday: Monorail Postcard from Walt Disney World

One of the most unique forms of transportation, “The Monorail” transports you to the Magic Kingdom Park to Epcot with stops at some of the famous Disney Resort hotels in between.

This postcard has a rather odd juxtaposition of the monorail, Tomorrowland and Cinderella Castle. I’m assuming the vantage point is between the Magic Kingdom bus stop and the Contemporary Resort. It’s actually a very cluttered image for the postcard and really surprises me that Disney used it for promotional purposes.

Do you have a favorite postcard from the Disney theme parks?