The Imagineering Process by Louis Prosperi

The Imagineering Process by Louis Prosperi

The Imagineering process is magic. And art. And science.

Imagineering is a process and it’s a system that you can apply to your life and creative work.

Louis Prosperi is a fan of Imagineering and has spent years studying and documenting the art of Disney theme park design. He sent me a review copy of his latest book, The Imagineering Process: Using the Disney Theme Park Design Process to Bring Your Creative Ideas to Life, which is the second title in his Imagineering Toolbox Series (I reviewed The Imagineering Pyramid, here).

The Imagineering Pyramid (book one) spotlights using Disney theme park design principles to develop your creative ideas. The Imagineering Process focuses on the steps to bringing your creative ideas to fruition.

The Imagineering Process: Bringing Your Creative Ideas to Life

The book is divided into three parts with fifteen chapters that take you step-by-step through the development of bringing your creative ideas to fruition. Louis does a tremendous job of distilling a daunting process into one understood by the general reader. The Imagineering Process is also a great title for anyone who has to work with a creative team.

Louis offers insights into the creative process from the Disney organization, other creative fields and his own endeavors. In some cases, the anecdotes are from Louis’s own personal experiences.

What I found most valuable about the book are the concrete examples that Louis offered. They helped to solidify the concepts as well as share real-life examples that you can follow. In some cases, the examples are famous Disney attractions, but Louis also shares projects that he worked on that are more relatable.

Each chapter is constructed like the book; he introduces the topic, gives examples, shows us how to implement them and wraps up the chapter with a checklist and questions. Louis sends us on our way with all the tools we need to take our creative ideas and implement them in our personal and professional lives.

The Imagineering Process: Disney Fans!

Just like in The Imagineering Pyramid, Louis proves he’s done his homework and provides a few gems for the Disney fans and historians. At the back of the book, you’ll find Appendix A and a Bibliography. Appendix A is Louis’s Imagineering Library. It is seven pages of books, periodicals, websites and other sources that Louis has collected over the years about Imagineers and Imagineering. Trust me: it’s an incredible list and you won’t find a better one outside of my personal collection.

The Bibliography is a five page list of all of the resources that Louis used in creating the book. Sadly, like most Theme Park Press titles, Bob McLain (the editor), doesn’t believe in endnotes or footnotes, which makes it difficult to verify what his authors are purporting. The lack of notes also diminishes the historical value of the titles for future researchers. I support Bob and what he’s doing, but I wish he would let his authors notate their sources. This really is important.

The Imagineering Process: Final Thoughts

The Imagineering Process is a must have for anyone working in a creative industry or  wants to get their creative juices flowing. The book is not full of exercises (which is good), but it’s full of solid advice and real-world anecdotes that will help you down the (often scary) path of creativity. People who manage creative groups will also find this book very helpful. Louis peppers the book with solid advice on managing creative projects from the perspective of a team leader. This book is a great addition to a manager’s toolbox!

Are You Going to Pick Up The Imagineering Process?


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the author for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

The Imagineering Pyramid by Louis Prosperi Book Review

The Imagineering Pyramid by Louis Prosperi, a Book Review

Wonder how the Imagineers design all of the amazing Disney attractions and resorts? Do you want to add creativity to your life and work?

Louis Prosperi is fascinated with the Disney Imagineers and the creative process. (Trust me, I’ve known him for years and he is as nerdy as me.) With his book, The Imagineering Pyramid, Lou takes his passion for Disney, mixes in his quest for creativity and creates a manual for developing and manging the creative flow. Lou takes us inside the world of imagineering and breaks down the creative process. He presents it in a way so we can use the same tools that Imagineers use to create the Disney magic we all love.

The Imagineering Pyramid is the first volume in the Imagineering Toolbox series. With the release of the second volume in the series, The Imagineering Process, I thought it would be a good time to re-visit the first book and offer a review (also, I realized that I never reviewed the first book – the review of the second volume will come soon).

The Imagineering Pyramid – What About Creativity?

Creativity is a big topic in the business world. It’s also something which many of us strive for in our personal lives. In the Imagineering Pyramid, Lou leads us through the process of adding creativity to our lives and work by understanding how the Imagineers create the magic of Disney theme parks. Through decades of research, Lou has scoured books and articles about imagineering and creativity. He translates that work into the fifteen principles which sets the imagineers apart from other creative industries. In the book, he offers concrete examples of how Disney puts the steps into practice. Lou demonstrates how we can, as well.

The Imagineering Pyramid surprised me on a few levels. The big surprise was how much I used the building blocks of the book without knowing it. Years of reading about Disney (some say obsessing over) allowed me to internalize without realizing it. Lou’s book solidified the concepts in my mind and reinforced the concepts on a grander scale. There were also many examples, which helped to ground the book in the real world. The book is not an academic treatise; it’s something you can apply and use often.

Lou submerged himself in the literature (trust me, I know every resource he listed) to pull out every detail. He created a workflow that made sense with most any creative endeavor even if it’s as simple as making a presentation! The Imagineering Pyramid is a resource you will use if you’re writing a blog post, working on a YouTube video or a corporate budget. The book also offers insight into managing the creative workflow for supervisors.

The Imagineering Pyramid – Why Should I Read This Book?

Reading The Imagineering Pyramid won’t make you an imagineer, but it will help you understand the creative process. The book will start you on your creative journey and you will think and feel creatively in your life and work. You will use these principles every day!

Fans of imagineering will love Lou’s approach, but the real treat is his bibliography and all of the resources he’s listed. If you can add these books to your library, you will be a thrilled Disney enthusiast.

Pick up The Imagineering Pyramid and add it to your Disney library; you won’t be disappointed. It’s one of the better titles from Theme Park Press and shows how passionate Lou is about the subject.

Have you read The Imagineering Pyramid? How have you added Disney creativity to your life?


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the author for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Park

Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Park by Jeff Kurtti, a book review

Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends is a book that’s going to make many theme park fans very happy! Disneyland, as we know it, would not exist today without the handpicked group of men and women that shaped the nascent theme park. Since their inception with the creation of Disneyland, the Imagineers have always been the architects and dreamers of Walt’s visions. Many of the names that you read about in Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Park will be familiar to Disney enthusiasts. As the name of the book implies, these are the legends of Disney Imagineering.

Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Park

Jeff Kurtti is a well-known and much-admired name in the Disney community. He has written many seminal works on the history of the theme parks, animated films, characters and theater. Since The World Began is one of his more treasured books. Make sure to check out the Art of Walt Disney World, too. Kurtti is also known for his work on several award-winning documentaries and as a consultant for film and theater. He has also worked with the Walt Disney Family Museum. The late Bruce Gordon served as editor on the project and his talents are seen throughout the book through the layout and design. Bruce was the author of the Nickel Tour, Walt’s Time and the Art of Disneyland (with Kurtti).

Kurtti mentions that his inspiration was John Canemaker’s Walt Disney’s Nine Old Men. Except he felt he came nowhere near the depth of Canemaker’s seminal work.

Many fans complain about the lack of certain key members, but that’s to be expected. Researching and writing a book about a group as large and nebulous as the Imagineers, it’s obvious that many of them could not be included or mentioned.  Kurtti has stated that he hopes to create a second volume.

Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Park

Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends melds many key ideas into one work: an introduction to 30 of the most famous and indispensible Imagineers; an insightful look into the creation of the theme parks; and a journey through a history of Imagineering. There is no other work published on this scale or within the same work. Each of the Imagineers chronicled is presented within their holistic context. The classifications are well-reflected and well-thought. Kurtti bestows the following categories: the Prototype Imagineers; the Place Makers; the Story Department; the Model Shop; the Machine Shop; the Music Makers and the Unofficial Imagineers. Special places are reserved for Walt Disney and John Hench.

You can find a lot of this information in other sources, such as The E-Ticket, Walt Disney Imagineering, the Art of Disneyland, Disneyland: The First Quarter Century, the Nickel Tour and Disneyland: Inside Story. But Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends is the only place you will find all of this information. That is the true brilliance of the book. Kurtti presents a seamless and well-organized view into the Imagineers and the creation of Disney theme parks.

Bruce Gordon did an astounding job with the layout of Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends. He truly was an incredible Imagineer and layout specialist. At the time of publication, there were new photographs and concept art throughout the book. Some of them haven’t been published elsewhere since then. The layout is very contemporary and very appealing. You never feel lost in columns of text (although, Kurtti is a great writer). My only issue with the layout is that some of the artwork and photographs are spread across two pages. Sometimes, it is difficult to get a good view of the artwork and you’ll want to study these images.

Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Park is for everyone.

Kurtti has created a book that lays a solid foundation of knowledge for Disney enthusiasts of all levels. Whether you are new to the Imagineers or a seasoned researcher, this compilation solidly portrays Imagineering and their singular importance within the Disney Company. This book will be within constant reach on my bookshelf for many years. It will also be an essential addition to every enthusiast’s library. Future Disney researchers will be thanking Kurtti for years to come. You need to own this book.

Have you read Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Park? Who is your favorite Imagineer?


Walt Disney World Books, a Bibliography

Walt Disney World Books!

Collecting Walt Disney World books can be a very pricey habit. I’ve been collecting Walt Disney World books since 1994. My current count of Disney-related and theme park titles puts me at 1000 books. I field a lot of questions about books specific to Walt Disney World history, especially books that discuss the Vacation Kingdom of the World (I usually recommend Jeff Kurtti’s Since the World Began and David Koenig’s Realityland since there isn’t one book that does it all).

Unfortunately, there isn’t one book that covers Walt Disney World history completely. There are several titles you can digest that will give you a very good picture. There are a lot of titles available and they come from different sources; check out the ones that look most interesting.

Most of us have written papers in high school or college that required a bibliography, which is usually a lists of sources cited in the paper. You can also have a list of books about a subject that stands alone.

What’s a bibliography?

The definition of a bibliography is:

a complete or selective list of works compiled upon some common principle, as authorship, subject, place of publication, or printer.http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/bibliography

This bibliography is by no means a complete list of books available on Walt Disney World; I have only added books that I own and have read. Feel free to leave a comment if I have missed something good!

Walt Disney World Books—General Interest

The books included in this set focus on more than just Walt Disney World. They look at the people behind the parks and the company. I consider each title an essential part of any Disney enthusiast’s library.

Walt Disney World Books—History

The following titles are specific to Walt Disney World and cover more than just an attraction. The Kurtti, Koenig and Beard titles are a must! If you are interested in the history and construction of Walt Disney World, check out these Walt Disney World books.

Walt Disney World Books—Attraction Specific

These Walt Disney World books are dedicated to specific attractions at Walt Disney World (and other parks, as well). If you have a favorite attraction that is featured in the book, then you need to track a copy or two down.

Walt Disney World Books—Artwork

There would be no Walt Disney World without these artists. The Kurtti/Gordon book offers wonderful concept art.

  • Handke, Danny; Hunt, Vanessa. The Poster Art of Disney Parks. 2012. A long time coming, this gorgeous books shares the amazing posters created for Disney attractions. A great look at some past attractions through posters.
  • Hench, John. Designing Disney. 2009. Hench shares his thoughts on helping to design every Disney theme park. The text is insightful and the artwork is astounding. Hench was the master designer of EPCOT Center and most of Walt Disney World.There is also a 2003 edition.
  • Kurrti, Jeff; Gordon, Bruce. The Art of Walt Disney World. 2009. Theme Park ExclusiveJeff and Bruce have collaborated again to create a sister volume to the wonderful Art of Disneyland. This large-scale book presents concept artwork from every phase of Walt Disney World’s history. Many of the images are seen here for the first time. Every fan of Walt Disney World should own this title. You can read my full review here.
  • Mumford, Dave; Gordon, Bruce. A Brush with Disney : An Artist’s Journey, Told through the words and works of Herbert Dickens Ryman. 2000. A look at Herb Ryman’s art–not just work done for Disney, but over his entire career. There are some amazing concept paintings of the Magic Kingdom. You can read my full review here.

Walt Disney World Books—Miscellaneous

Detailed-inspired travel guides, academic treatises and amazing photographic titles. Usually more of a time-capsule than a history title. There are some fantastic Walt Disney World books in this section. Some of them are geared more towards the serious student of Walt Disney World history and some offer images that will please anyone.

Walt Disney World Books—Celebration

Although Disney has divested themselves of Celebration for most intents, it is still an important part of the Walt Disney World story. These titles look more at the after effect of Disney’s town and less on Walt’s vision.

Walt Disney World Books—Cookbooks

Food is a huge part of the Disney Parks experience. Dining at Walt Disney World has changed considerably over the past 40 years. The following cookbooks are a great way to see what was being served at various restaurants over the years.

  • Brandon, Pam. Chef Mickey: Treasures from the Vault & Delicious New Favorites. 2010. An updated release that mixes new and historical recipes. There are some great photos, too.
  • Brandon, Pam. Cooking with Mickey and the Disney Chefs. 2004. Mostly modern recipes, but there are a lot of favorites from all Disney parks.
  • Brandon, Pam. Delicious Disney. 2006. More recent recipes from Disney parks and the Disney Cruise Line.
  • Chapman, Dorothy. Thought You’d Never Ask (Part I and Part II). 1979 and 1983. One of the first compilations of recipes from Walt Disney World and local Orlando restaurants. This could surprise you with what was actually being served and what was considered haute couture dining. You can read my review of Part II here.
  • Cooking with Mickey: Walt Disney World’s Most Requested Recipes (Volume I and Volume II). 1986 & 2000. Another look at Disney recipes. Not as much flash as some of the newer books, but it has a lot of recipes from restaurants that are no longer or have changed substantially.

 

This is by no means a complete list. There are a few titles I have left out simply because I don’t own them.

Are there any that I should include on the list?

Do you have any favorite  Walt Disney World books or one that you always recommend?


Building a Better Mouse, a book review

Book Review: Building a Better Mouse

Building A Better Mouse relates the story of two Imagineers, Steve Alcorn and David Green, and their work during the three years of designing and building EPCOT Center. Steve begins the story at the end when the project is over and he has to deal with being let go from the company. Pretty auspicious. From there, he takes us back to his beginnings with WED Engineering working in Department 510, a group of electronic engineers. Steve delves into a fairly standard introduction to Walt’s dream for Epcot and the development of the theme park before beginning the real adventure: building the American Adventure!

What you get with Building a Better Mouse is a deeply satisfying look into what it was like to work for Disney during the design, development and construction of the world’s most expensive theme park (and the largest private construction project) at the time. Although it is written by an electrical engineer (Alcorn), the narrative is very enjoyable and fun to read. Green steps in to offer his thoughts and “contributed all the sections that sound like they were written by an English major.” (Alcorn–Acknowledgments)

About halfway through reading Building a Better Mouse, I realized that I would never look at any theme park attraction in the same light. Attractions at Disney parks are usually so polished that you take everything for granted. Reading about Steve working more than 24 hours in a row in order to get a lift functioning is mind-boggling. Steve describes the size and scope of the infrastructure of the American Adventure and relates it on a level in which you can comprehend the grandness and inter-operability of each part. It’s amazing to think of the systems that were developed that keep the attractions running all day, day after day.

Steve and David take us behind-the-scenes at WED in California where we share a glimpse of what it was like to work at Disney. When they write about their time in Lake Buena Vista where all WED employees were given a rental car, a trailer at Ft. Wilderness and the ultimatum of finishing Epcot by October 1, you’re amazed how it all came together. It’s hard to imagine the demand that was pressed upon these young and idealistic engineers, but after seeing the results, it must have been well worth it.

Building A Better Mouse is a fascinating look at an amazing time in Disney history; especially one written by an insider who loves the magic as much as most enthusiasts. There’s nothing else like it that looks into the development of a single attraction or the life that Imagineers lived during the heyday of building a theme park. If you are a fan of Imagineering, theme parks or Disney, then you will love this title. I wish that it had been a little more in-depth, but I am not sure what else the authors could have added.

Building a Better Mouse: About the Authors

Steve Alcorn and David Green wrote this book to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Epcot in 2007. Steve worked for WED during the construction of the American Adventure (the subject of the book) and currently runs Alcorn McBride. He is still heavily involved in the theme park industry and teaches a class on theme park design at Imagineering Class. David spent many years working for the Walt Disney Company on the Fantasyland refurb, Epcot and Tokyo Disneyland. He is the principal creative at Monteverdi Creative with a long list of accomplishments.

Have you read Building a Better Mouse? Do you have a favorite theme park-related book?

UPDATED: Steve Alcorn sent me a link with some of the photos from that time period. They are stunning!

http://www.stevealcorn.com/atwork/Epcot/index.html


Book Review: Harriet Burns, Walt Disney’s First Lady of Imagineering

Walt Disney’s First Lady of Imagineering: Harriet Burns by Pam Burns-Clair and Don Peri. 2010

Harriet Burns. Her name is synonymous with Imagineering and the creation of early Disneyland. Not only was she one of Walt’s first Imagineers, but she was the first woman in Imagineering, hence her title, the First Lady of Imagineering. She worked on the development of Sleeping Beauty’s Castle, Pirates of the Caribbean, the Haunted Mansion, the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair and countless other rides, attractions and resorts. Harriet retired in 1986 after 31 years of creating magic for the Walt Disney Company.

Joanne Campbell wrote about a trip to Walt Disney World with Harriet Burns in the early 1990s:

The following morning Harriet had made reservations at a park restaurant she knew served the famous Mickey Mouse pancakes. She insisted on paying the bill because she said that her Disney card would entitle her to a discount. Of course we thanked her, but we didn’t think too much of it. When she presented her card to the waiter, she said she hoped it was alright, because this card was actually from California. The waiter disappeared for some time, and suddenly the manager appeared. He was quite perplexed and said, “Mrs. Burns, was everything satisfactory? Michael [Eisner] usually alerts us when you’re on the property!” With that, OUR eyes popped open in amazement, and we began to realize that the term Imagineer (and her #7 on the credit card) was something extraordinary.

Because Harriet was retired at this point, she herself had not seen MGM, which had just opened in Orlando. We hopped on a double-decker English bus with the throngs, and hadn’t gone too far before Harriet said, “Look, boys, there is the old airplane that Bill and I rode to New York with Walt in for the World’s Fair!” My husband and I exchanged looks, and sure enough, the tour guide then said, “and THIS is the plane that Walt took to the World’s Fair.”
–p. 42, Walt Disney’s First Lady of Imagineering

The book is replete with stories that will touch your heart. It is so much more than a tribute book to Harriet, it is also a look at how special and amazing it was to be one of Walt’s Imagineers. This book is perfect for anyone interested in Imagineering, Walt or the amazing people that were fortunate enough to meet Harriet. She was an inspiring woman!

Pam Burns-Chair, Harriet’s daughter, worked with author and Disney Historian Don Peri to create and compile this list of eulogies and tributes by family, friends and Disney employees. 67 essays, ranging in size from a few paragraphs to several pages help tell the story of how Harriet touched so many people’s lives. The book is filled with over 200 photographs that span Harriet’s life and her career at Disney.

After reading  this marvelous title, I felt like I had the opportunity to meet Harriet through the eyes of her family and friends. She was well-loved, respected and admired. Some of the best anecdotes were supplied by former Imagineers that had developed a special relationship with Harriet. She was known for having an off-color sense of humor that seemed to be in opposition to her native Texan drawl. Many of the Imagineers wrote that Harriet was personable and never forgot anyone she met.

Chelsea Clair, the daughter of Pam and the granddaughter of Harriet, designed the book. She did a wonderful job of laying out the pages and integrating the photographs into the text. Pam, Don and Chelsea should be very proud of the book they put together in honor of Harriet. Their love and the love of Harriet’s friends and family.

I would also be remiss if I didn’t mention Scott Wolf, Disney Historian and owner of MouseClub House Scott helped with the project and created the website for the book at Imagineer Harriet.

You can also be come a Fan of Imagineer Harriet on Facebook.

This is a sentimental and beautiful look at Harriet Burns and her life in and outside of Disney. Look at Walt Disney’s First Lady of Imagineering: Harriet Burns as more than a tribute; Pam and Don have compiled stories that give you an intimate look at what it was like to work for the Walt Disney Company with Walt and the heralded Imagineers.

The book provided was a review copy from the publisher.

Don’t forget to stop by our site and leave some Disney Geek love!

http://www.imaginerding.com

Book Review Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Park

Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Parkby Jeff Kurtti, 146 pp, 2008.

This has been an eagerly anticipated book in the Disney community. Since their inception with the creation of Disneyland, the Imagineers have always been the architects and dreamers of Walt’s visions. Many of the names that you read about in the book will be familiar to Disney enthusiasts; as the name of the book implies, these are the legends of Disney Imagineering.

Jeff Kurtti is a well-known and much-admired name in the Disney community. He has written many seminal works on the history of the theme parks, animated films, characters and theater. Since The World Beganis one of his more treasured books. Jeff is also known for his work on several award-winning documentaries and as a consultant for film and theater. Currently, he is working with the Walt Disney Family Museum. The late Bruce Gordon served as editor on the project and his talents are seen throughout the book through the layout and design. Bruce was the author of The Nickel Tour,Walt’s Time and The Art of Disneyland(with Jeff).


In an interview with Didier Ghez, Jeff talks about the motivation behind the book:

The inspiration for Walt Disney’s Imagineering Legends was John Canemaker’s Walt Disney’s Nine Old Men. I say inspiration, since my book comes nowhere near the depth and erudition of John’s great work, but the inspiration was to create a work that would familiarize people with the core team of creative people within the initial development of Disneyland.

The animation group, as a rule, is more familiar to people, and the Imagineering group is less well-known, the history of how they came together is much less documented. It’s very important for new generations of fans to get a proper introduction to this information, it’s important for the Company to preserve a record that illuminates and contextualizes key periods of its history.
http://disneybooks.blogspot.com/2008/07/next-month-will-see-release-of-jeff.html

I am not sure I could have said it better myself. In looking at a group as large and nebulous as the Imagineers, it is obvious that any work on them could not be inclusive. Many people have iterated their complaints about the lack of certain key members, but that is to be expected. Jeff has already stated that he hopes to create a second volume.


Imagineering Legends is able to meld several key ideas into one book: an introduction to 30 of the most famous and key Imagineers; an insightful look into the creation of the theme parks; and a journey through a history of Imagineering. There has not been another work published on this scale or within the same pages. Each of the Imagineers chronicled is presented within their holistic context. The classifications are well-reflected and well-thought. Jeff bestows the following categories: the Prototype Imagineers; the Place Makers; the Story Department; the Model Shop; the Machine Shop; the Music Makers and the Unofficial Imagineers. Special places are reserved for Walt Disney and John Hench.


Most of this information can be found in other sources, such as The E-Ticket, Walt Disney Imagineering, The Art of Disneyland, Disneyland: The First Quarter Century, The Nickel Tourand Disneyland: Inside Story. But Imagineering Legends is the only place you will find all of this information. That is the true brilliance of the book. Jeff presents a seamless and well-organized view into the Imagineers and the creation of Disney theme parks.

Bruce Gordon did an amazing job with the layout of Imagineering Legends. There are new photographs and concept art throughout the book. The layout is very contemporary and very appealing; you never feel lost in columns of text (although, Jeff is a great writer). My only issue with the layout is that some of the artwork and photographs are spread across two pages. Sometimes, it is difficult to get a good view of the artwork.

Bottom Line: This work is for everyone. Jeff has created a book that lays a solid foundation of knowledge for Disney enthusiasts of all levels. Whether you are new to the Imagineers or a seasoned researcher, this compilation solidly portrays Imagineering and their importance within the Disney Company. This book will be within constant reach on my bookshelf for many years. It will also be an essential addition to every enthusiast’s library. Future Disney researchers will be thanking Jeff for years to come. You need to own this book.

Don’t forget to stop by our site and leave some Disney Geek love!

http://www.imaginerding.com