Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Video Book Review

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Cartoons by David Bossert Book Review

Are you a fan of Oswald the Lucky Rabbit?

If so, then check out my review of Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Cartoons by David Bossert. This book follows David Bossert’s search for the 13 lost Oswald cartoons. Did he find them all?

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Video

Do You Have a Lost Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Cartoon?


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the publisher for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Disney Pixar Pop-Up A Celebration

Disney Pixar Pop-Up A Celebration

A review copy of Disney Pixar Pop-Up A Celebration arrived and I was pretty excited to check it out. Matthew Reinhart is known for creating intricate works of pop-up art.

Video Review of Disney Pixar Pop-Up A Celebration

Let me know what you think about the new pop-up book all about the Pixar films and shorts. Is it something that you would buy?


Don’t forget to stop by my YouTube channel to subscribe and leave a comment! I post weekly videos about Disney, Dollywood, Carowinds, theme park history, roller coasters and Disney books.

FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the publisher for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Cars 3 on Blu-ray, a review

Cars 3 on Blu-ray!

Cars 3 on blu-ray has just been released. Are you going to add it to your collection?

The original Cars was released in 2006 and became the most lucrative franchise that Disney owned. After a billion-dollar expansion of Disney California Adventure to create Cars Land, we’ve seen two sequels and a number of shorts. Honestly, I never thought that Pixar would make sequels, but it seems as if Lasseter is doing his best to beef up the Disney coffers.

It’s Cars 3 on blu-ray and 4K Ultra HD!

Cars 3 is the third part of Lightning McQueen’s journey. At first I wasn’t really interested in seeing the film, simply because I couldn’t imagine where they could take it. Would it be like the Rocky films? You know, where he was on top and then got beat down? Then he had to find his way back up.

I have to admit that I was pleasantly surprised by the turns that the film took. There were some surprises with the plot and characters, as well as some very charming moments. An eye-opening moment after watching the film concerned the lack of a perceived villain. Except for McQueen feeling out of place, it was refreshing to see a family film with no clear-cut villain.

The film is absolutely gorgeous and showcases how far technology and artistry have come. The part of the film that takes in Thomasville, North Carolina, really had the flavor of the rural area. On a different note, all of the main characters from Cars were played as ancillary to the story. They were all there, but they were mostly ties to Radiator Springs and McQueen’s older life.

Cars 3 on Blu-ray: The Bonus Features!

The bonus features added a lot to the film, especially thinking about how they had to make a sequel in the series. How would you characterize changing a character as well as how to create a story that wasn’t formulaic.

Bonus Features*

Blu-ray & Digital:

  • Miss Fritter’s Racing Skoool (Exclusive new mini-movie) – Enjoy blindsided testimonials from the Crazy 8’s, touting the transformative impact Miss Fritter’s Racing School has had in reshaping the direction of their lives.
  • Theatrical Short: “Lou” – When a toy-stealing bully ruins recess for a playground full of kids, only one thing stands in his way: the “Lost and Found” box.
  • Let’s. Get. Crazy. – Get schooled in the world of demolition derby, the “rules” of figure 8 racing, and how Pixar puts the crazy in the Thunder Hollow Crazy 8 race. This piece is hosted by Lea DeLaria.
  • Legendary – a close, historical look at the racing legends Wendell Scott and Louise Smith, whose tenacity and perseverance got them into the race even when they weren’t invited.
  • Ready for the Race – Disney Channel’s Olivia Rodrigo and NASCAR Racer William Byron check out the Hendrick Motorsports campus to showcase how real-world race training influenced the filmmakers.
  • World’s Fastest Billboard – Blink and you will miss all of the graphics and “car-ified” advertisements created by Pixar’s Art team to make the ”Cars 3” world as believable as possible.
  • Cruz Ramirez: The Yellow Car That Could – Join Cristela Alonzo and the filmmakers on their journey to create a race-car trainer turned champion racer.
  • Generations: The Story of “Cars 3” – For the story team, creating Lightning McQueen’s next chapter didn’t involve just a tune-up, but a complete overhaul.
  • My First Car – A collection of illustrated first-car stories as narrated by members of the “Cars 3” cast and crew. “A Green Car on the Red Carpet with Kerry Washington,” “Old Blue,” and “Still in the Family.”
  • 5 Deleted Scenes – Each deleted scene is set up with an introduction as to why it was removed from the film. Deleted scenes include “The Boogie Woogie,” “The Jars of Dirt,” “Lugnut,” “The Bolt,” and “More Than New Paint.”
  • Cars To Die(cast) For – Take a look at the phenomenon of die-cast toy collecting and the more than 1,000 unique designs that exist in the Cars universe.
  • Commentary – Brian Fee (Director), Kevin Reher (Producer), Andrea Warren (Co-Producer) and Jay Ward (Creative Director)
  • And more…

Are you going to check out Cars 3 on Blu-ray?


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the publisher for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Ink & Paint: The Women of Walt Disney’s Animation

Ink & Paint: The Women of Walt Disney’s Animation by Mindy Johnson, a book review

I’ve been waiting for a book like Ink & Paint: The Women of Disney’s Animation for a long time. My review copy arrived a while ago and I was thrilled to tear into it. I loved Johnson’s earlier work on Tinker Bell, so I was hoping for another great read.The book, by Mindy Johnson, finally sheds light on the unsung heroes of Disney animation, whenever they were inkers, assistant animators, story artists or music editors. At a time when women were paid less than men and had a much harder time finding work, the Walt Disney Studios employed a large number of women to keep making animated films and shorts.

Johnson’s book dives deeply into the history of the studio and the women that worked there, uncovering tidbits that have never been discussed before. The book starts with the earliest days of animation and the contributions that women made early on in the industry, well before Disney started animating.

Ink & Paint, singularly, is an important work for animation fans, Disney historians and women’s studies. The light that is shed on women in the animation industry has not been covered elsewhere. Individuals, from female department heads to inkers to background painters and more, are all discussed in earnest, through anecdotes and interviews. Johnson also looks at the secretaries, librarians and service workers that were part of the workforce.

The one drawback to the book is also it’s greatest strength; the animation process is covered in tremendous detail, which tends to bog down the work in many parts. The amount of detail that Johnson uncovers and shares is astounding, especially concerning the women from the first years of the inking and painting department. This shouldn’t stop you from buying the book, just keep in mind that it can get technical.

Although the male animators have always been seen as the driving force, it is quickly ascertainable that the Walt Disney Studios could not have functioned without a core workforce of women.

The insight about the daily work life of the Disney Studio employee is astounding. Johnson discusses how the work processes were handled and distributed, as well as how the employees took breaks, lunches and socialized. We learn about the Tea Room, the different areas for male and female employees, and the growth of the studio lot.

Ink & Paint is an incredibly insightful work on animation and the contributions of women on staff. As I mentioned, it’s very dense at times and offers a large amount of information. It is a coffee-table book with a lot of rare images from the studios, but it’s not a book you can read in just a few sittings.

Ink & Paint is a must have!

Title: Ink & Paint: The Women of Walt Disney’s Animation
Author: Mindy Johnson
ISBN: 978-148472781-2
Release Date: September 5, 2017

Are you going to buy Ink & Paint: The Women of Walt Disney’s Animation by Mindy Johnson, a book review


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the publisher for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons

Fans of Oswald the Lucky rabbit, early Disney Studios history and animation history need to buy this book right now!

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, Walt Disney’s earliest star, paved the way for Mickey Mouse. But what happened to Oswald? Based on the contract with Charles Mintz and Universal, Disney lost the rights to Oswald in 1928 after a series of successful animated shorts. When Disney decided to bring Oswald back into the company in 2003, there were many of the shorts lost to time. So, Disney acquired the rights and began to find the animated shorts.

In 2007, when the Walt Disney Treasures – The Adventures of Oswald the Lucky Rabbit was released on DVD, only 13 of the Oswald shorts were available and a few had been reconstructed to the best of the producers’ knowledge. It was assumed the the other 13 shorts were lost forever.

In 2011, David Bossert (animator, filmmaker and author) ran across an auction for the Oswald short, Hungry Hobos; he convinced the Disney Company to pursue the film to restore and add to its library. Thus began the genesis of the book: Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons.

Working with animation historian and archival editor David Gerstein, Bossert traces the journey that spanned the globe to hunt down and acquire as many Oswald films as possible.

The first four chapters of the book detail the history of Oswald and the company. They quickly go into the re-aquiring, restoration, preservation and music of the shorts. The majority of the book (also known as chapter five) examines every Oswald the Lucky Rabbit animated short produced by Walt Disney. In wonderfully exhaustive detail.

Each cartoon has several pages dedicated to it. Bossert discusses how the short was found (if it was lost) and who did most of the work (usually Ub Iwerks) and the public reception. Then, Bossert does a complete breakdown of the film in narrative form. This is quite charming to see the changes over time in the Oswald shorts, as well as the breakthroughs in story-telling. Included are production sketches, poster concepts and stills from the restored prints.

What About the Lost Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Cartoons?

For the lost cartoons, Bossert relies on as much information as can be found in archives and media. When available, the entire script is reprinted, since it might be the only information. In other cases, reviews of the shorts are presented outlining the story. Almost every short has some artwork, but it varies greatly in amount.

In some cases, the film is still completely lost and all that is available are scripts and production notes. The only information we have about the final product is based on reviews that appeared in newspapers or film publications. It surprised me at how much information was available, considering the films changed hands. It goes to show how well Disney retained documentation.

With the thirteen lost films, it’s quite eye-opening to think about the state of animation and the ability to preserve early films. With so many missing films, not just the Oswald titles, we could see a change in how animation history is presented and Bossert’s book is one that can lead the way.

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons is a spectacular book and one that Oswald and Disney fans need to buy. Animation historians will treasure this book and, hopefully, it will lead to other finds. Bossert (and Gerstein) have set a standard that can be followed by other historians. The book is fun, engaging and enlightening.

You don’t happen to have a lost Oswald the Lucky Rabbit cartoon, do you?

Title: Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons
Author: David A. Bossert, David Gerstein (Archival Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-4847-8037-4
Release Date: August 217, 2017

Are you going to pick up Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons by David Bossert?


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the publisher for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Music in Disney’s Animated Features by James Bohn

Music in Disney’s Animated Features by James Bohn, a book review

Music in Disney’s Animated Features: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to The Jungle Book, is one of those books that surprises you. Although the book does follow the title, it’s so much more than just a work on the music of Walt Disney’s animated films.

Music in Disney’s Animated Features by James Bohn

I’ve known James for a few years (we’ve followed each other on social media), and I had no idea that he was working on this book until he asked if I’d like a review copy. Obviously, I said yes and I received a copy from the University Press of Mississippi.

James covers the early Mickey shorts, the Silly Symphonies and all of the animated features until Walt’s passing. The book has 294 pages, but he also has extensive notes, a bibliography, index and appendix. It’s quite obvious that James did his homework and has a love for the music in the animated films.

The table of contents of Music in Disney’s Animated Features by James Bohn

I will be the first to admit that some of the book does go over my head, especially when James is discussing very specific musical terms, but I enjoyed reading all of it. What blew me away was all of the biographical information that James provided on the various songwriters, composers and musicians that worked with Walt Disney and the studios. James was even able to bring to light a few musicians that I had never heard of. James tracked down an impressive amount of biographical research.

James also traces the evolution of music in the films. From simple scoring to accent the action (Mickey Mousing) to full-fledged orchestration to punch the emotions, James looks at every nuance of music and film. With each film, he also looks at the reception of the music as well as popular reactions. He lists all of the covers that other people have done as well as re-issues. James is also able to point out when Disney made a leap forward in technology and music or with using music in general.

There is so much in Music in Disney’s Animated Features that it’s almost hard to recount!

James has created a work that future researches are going to cherish. Modern fans and enthusiasts are going to enjoy it as well. The insight provided hasn’t been featured in other places, mainly because James is uniquely qualified to offer thoughts on music and film.

If you’re a fan of the animated films of Walt Disney or film and music, then you need to grab a copy of the book today!

Are you going to pick up Music in Disney’s Animated Features by James Bohn?

Title: Music in Disney’s Animated Features: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to The Jungle Book
Author: James Bohn
ISBN: 978-1-4968-1214-8
Release Date: May 12, 2017


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the publisher for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Disney’s Alice In Wonderland, a book review

Walt Disney’s Alice in Wonderland, a book review

For many, the blonde Alice in the blue pinafore from the 1951 Disney’s Alice in Wonderland is the classic look. Others prefer the 1865 Tenniel wood-engraved illustrations while the 2010 and 2016 Tim Burton film versions have taken hold with Mad Hatter fans.

No matter what your favorite Alice, Mark Salisbury has written a fantastic book for Alice in Wonderland fans that takes us down the rabbit hole of the Carroll’s books, multiple films and theme park appearances.

Walt Disney’s Alice in Wonderland: the animated films

Like most of the film-related compendium books that bridge the animated and live-action films, Salisbury’s work treads familiar grounds. He starts with a deep look at the history of the original text as well as pulling in information about Lewis Carroll and the influences of the book. Because of the visual nature of the films, Salisbury spends a lot of time looking at Tenniel’s original illustrations and how the iconic images have influenced everything that followed.

Expectedly, the meat of the book covers the Disney’s Alice in Wonderland animated film released in 1951. Alice in Wonderland was a film that Disney spent years trying to make, always grappling, in some form, with the nature of the beloved story. There were many production crews saddled with wrestling the work into an animated film, with very few approaching what Walt wanted to see. Like most of Disney’s Alice in Wonderland criticism of the time, it was still a difficult film to create and enjoy. Also, like many of the Disney animated films, Alice’s popularity has grown with the generations.

Salisbury also presents the beginnings of the Disney Studios since Alice was integral in the early successes for Walt and Roy. The Alice comedies were a take on the Out of the Inkwell films and Salisbury shares how the films helped direct the Disneys to the development of everything that followed, like Oswald the Lucky Rabbit and the use of Alice themes in the Mickey and Silly Symphonies shorts.

Works influenced by Alice in Wonderland, like Donald in Mathmagic Land, have a small section, that includes a look at the television specials and commercials featuring Alice and crew. There is so much fantastic concept artwork and images from the Studios during production. Salisbury is able to juxtapose concept art and the final cells that were used in the animated film.

Walt Disney’s Alice In Wonderland: the theme parks

Throughout the book, Salisbury added sections that look at how Disney’s Alice in Wonderland appeared in the theme parks all over the world. From attractions to characters to shows, we get a glimpse at Alice and her friends making magic. They are fun sections that fans of the theme parks are going to enjoy.

Walt Disney’s Alice In Wonderland: the live-action films

With the release of Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland in 2010, Disney ushered in a new look for Alice and crew. The familiar characters have all grown up, so to speak, and sport the characteristic Burton darkness and whimsy. The book tracks the process of the films, including the first sparks and the creative process to bring them to fruition. It offers a new appreciation for the Alice in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking Glass films

This is a great book that fans of Disney’s Alice in Wonderland are going to love. The history is presented well and the rest of the book offers insight into the production of the various films and shorts. I love that Salisbury is able to tie the Alice Comedies so well into the history of the Disney Studios. I highly recommend this book for the lay animation fan.

Title: Walt Disney’s Alice in Wonderland: An Illustrated Journey Through Time
Author: Mark Salisbury
ISBN: 978-1484737699
Release Date: April 12, 2016

Are you going to pick up Walt Disney’s Alice in Wonderland: An Illustrated Journey Through Time?


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the publisher for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Tale As Old As Time: the Art and Making of Beauty and the Beast

Tale As Old As Time: the Art and Making of Beauty and the Beast by Charles Solomon

I reviewed the original edition of Charles Solomon’s Tale As Old As Time book back in 2010 when it was released. I loved the book and appreciated the depth and knowledge that Solomon presented. With the release of the live-action movie and the additions of Beauty and the Beast to the Magic Kingdom, I was hoping to see a lot of great updates in the new edition when I received the review copy.

Beauty and the Beast fans, regardless of whether it’s love for the animated film or the live-action release (or both), will love this book. Walt Disney World fans will appreciate the section on New Fantasyland at the Magic Kingdom.

The largest section of Tale As Old As Time, with more than 150 pages, focuses on the animated classic. There are interviews with the animation artists, the production crew and the individuals behind the creation of the story. There’s a lot of concept are that’s presented and you get a very good look at how the story evolved. You also see that it was a heavily involved process that included changing the original direction (and concept artists) and orienting the new Disney management on making an animated film. Don Hahn offered a lot of insight and anecdotes to Solomon, who deftly wove them into the book to help tell the story of the animated film.

The newest sections dealt with the live-action film and the additions to the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World. The section on New Fantasyland includes some great photos of the interior of the Be Our Guest restaurant. They also discussed how they came up with some of the concepts for the area and spoke with a lot of the Imagineers about the overall changes. The design of the Lumiere animatronic at the Storytime with Belle attraction was interesting; it was a first for both Imagineering and Walt Disney Feature Animation to work together on a project like this. There is the same section on the Broadway musical, but there was nothing updated from the 2010 release of the book.

The section on the live-action is really going to make fans of the film very happy. It was a little bit longer than the section on the Magic Kingdom but there were a lot of different things to cover, including concept art and design. There were a lot of interviews with the cast; it was nice to get their perspective on remaking a classic animated film. You really got the sense that all of them revered the film and took their roles very seriously. They knew that they were messing with a movie that people were passionate about.

Tale as Old as Time: The Art and Making of Disney Beauty and the Beast (Updated Edition): Inside Stories from the Animated Classic to the New Live-action Film by Charles Solomon is a definite purchase for fans of Beauty and the Beast. It’s full of concept art, animation stills, storyboards and photos of all of the crew involved in both films.

Are you going to pick up Charles Solomon’s Tale As old as Time book?


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the publisher for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Bambi Signature Edition on Blu-ray

Bambi Signature Edition on Blu-ray

The Bambi Signature Edition has just been released to coincide and celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Disney classic animated film. Is it worth picking up this release?

Bambi, the Disney Studios fifth animated film, was released during World War II on August 9, 1942 in London. The New York City premiere was on August 13. The initial reaction to the film was semi-negative, mainly due to the perceived move away from Disney’s fantastical animated worlds. Disney regularly re-released animated films about every ten years or so, in order to capture new audiences and keep the films in the public eye. Of course, this also helped the bottom end, since the film could recoup and surpass initial costs.

Today, Bambi is considered a Disney classic by any standard.

Should you pick up the Bambi Signature Edition on blu-ray?

The film is gorgeous and the blu-ray transfer is top-notch. It’s amazing how sharp and clear the film is. The audio even feels new. I think it comes down to whether you own the 2011 release or not.

Bambi Signature Edition Special Features

If you already own the 2011 blu-ray release, then you’re not going to find much a difference, except for a few of the features. Most of the brand new content is good, but not as deep, historically, as we’ve seen on previous releases.

BRAND NEW:

  • THE BAMBI EFFECT – “Bambi” was full of innovations for its time. Let’s take a look at how those past innovations affected future Disney animated titles all the way up to todaySTUDIO STORIES: “BAMBI” – Recordings of Walt Disney. Listen in on intimate moments where he discusses the challenges, pitfalls and triumphs during the production of “Bambi.”
  • DELETED SCENE: BAMBI’S ICE AND SNOW – Bambi coaxes Thumper and his brothers and sisters to come play on the ice during the first snow.
  • DELETED SCENE: THE GRASSHOPPER – A grasshopper confronts Bambi and Thumper and finds himself in quite a predicament.
  • BAMBI FAWN FACTS – Think you know everything there is to know about Bambi and his forest companions? Well, it’s time to discover some fun real-life facts about the creatures that live in the forest he calls home.
  • OSWALD THE LUCKY RABBIT: “AFRICA BEFORE DARK” – Oswald Short.

Overall, the Bambi Effect featurette was the best of the bunch. The Studio Stories was well done, with a mixture of Walt’s actual voice and an actor’s voice. The Oswald the Lucky Rabbit short was very surprising and a wonderful way to show how much animation changed from Oswald to Bambi.

CLASSIC:

  • DELETED SCENES – Two Leaves, Bambi Stuck on a Reed, Winter Grass, Twitterpated
  • THE MAKING OF BAMBI: A PRINCE IS BORN
    -STORY: TELLING THE TALE
    -CHARACTERS: DRAWN TO NATURE
    -ACTORS: GIVING VOICE TO ANIMALS
    -ART DESIGN: IMPRESSIONS OF THE FOREST
    -MUSIC: NATURE’S SYMPHONY
    -HISTORY: BACK TO THE BEGINNING
  • TRICK OF THE TRADE (Excerpt)
  • INSIDE THE DISNEY ARCHIVES
  • THE OLD MILL: ANIMATED SHORT
  • ORIGINAL THEATRICAL TRAILER
  • THE GOLDEN AGE

The Classic features were well done, but I had seen them all before. There’s a lot more history involved with them, so you have to check them out if you haven’t seen them before. The transfer is not as crisp as the new features, but they’re full of information.

Bambi Signature Edition on Digital HD

As with other releases, Bambi comes with a download code for the Disney Movies Anywhere digital download. This is the first time Bambi has been offered in this format and might be reason enough to buy the blu-ray.

The Digital HD version also has an extra feature not found on the blu-ray:

CELEBRATING TYRUS WONG (DIGITAL EXCLUSIVE) – A heartfelt look at the man who played a key role in the success of “Bambi.” Much like Mary Blair and Eyvind Earle, Tyrus Wong had a unique signature style all to his own. The soft water-colored backgrounds and beautiful palettes in “Bambi” were inspired by Tyrus’ concept art paintings.

Speaking of celebrating Tyrus Wong, there was a small, stand-up print dedicated to Tyrus inside the package.

Overall, I loved the Bambi Signature Edition blu-ray release. If you don’t own the 2011 copy, then you need to buy this one. Even if you own the 2011 release, the Signature Edition is a beautiful transfer and is worth a look.

Are you going to pick up the Bambi Signature Edition on blu-ray?


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the publisher for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!

Tangled Before Ever After, DVD Review

Tangled Before Ever After, a DVD Review

Tangled Before Ever After is the Disney Channel original film that introduces the new animated series, Tangled. So, Tangled Before Ever After takes place between the animated film and the Tangled Ever After short. And Tangled Ever After takes place after the Tangled series. I think…

It gets a little timey-wimey if you think about it too much.

I love the Tangled film, especially the music, and I really enjoyed the Tangled shorts. When I saw the DVD release, I was highly interested in the continuation of the story despite it looking a wee bit childish. The animation looked simple and blocky, and I wasn’t sure if the style would work well. I had to remind myself that it was a Disney Channel film introducing a television series

Tangled Before Ever After takes place before the wedding (about six months before in Tangled time). You get the feeling that Rapunzel loves her new life but still feels a little bit like a captive. Part of the story is that everyone in the film, including the king and queen, have to learn how to live with Rapunzel after almost 18 years of her being missing. More importantly, Rapunzel has to learn how to be a princess despite her desire to be free. She loves her life but still longs for some semblance of freedom.

While the plans for a royal debut for Rapunzel are underway, Flynn decides to ask Rapunzel a very important question. This sets off a chain of events that lead to Rapunzel discovering things about herself, as well as her family. Of course, being a Disney Channel movie, there has to be a villain. This time we get a new one who is a little bit of a surprise. I think Disney learned a lot from Frozen and even though they paint a villain a certain way, you might not be aware of what they’re doing.

I enjoyed the art style but it took a little while to get used to it, especially after the feature film. It was very reminiscent of Mary Blair and the Johnny Appleseed style of she created. It did seem to work well with the story as well as the characters.

Overall, the film was very cute and I enjoyed it.

Tangled Before Ever After is a great introduction to the animated series; hopefully it will propel that story forward. I do hope we can get a lot out of the animated series, considering that they’ve used all of the major voice talent from the film.

Are you going to check out Tangled Before Ever After?


FTC Disclosure: A copy was provided by the publisher for the purpose of this review. This post contains affiliate links, which means that ImagiNERDing receives a percentage of sales purchased through links on this site. Thank you for your support!