Walt Disney World Railroad, a History

Grand Circle Tour: the History of the Walt Disney World Railroad.

Four out of five Disney historians will agree* that Walt’s love for steam trains was one of the motivating factors that led to Disneyland. Trains were a large part of his life growing up in the midwest and served as one of Walt’s first jobs as a news butch during his teen years. When Walt first started thinking about a theme park, a steam train was always part of his thoughts. As the dream progressed from a small park near the Burbank Studio to Disneyland, Walt continued to anchor the designs with a train.

As an author, you would be hard-pressed to write about Walt Disney and trains and not mention the Carolwood-Pacific. When Walt moved his family to the Holmby Hills neighborhood in 1949, he realized that he had enough land to create a backyard railroad. With the help of studio workers and Roger Broggie (known as the first Imagineer), Walt constructed over 2,600 feet of track, a 1/8 scale engine and several cars. The engine was called the Lilly Belle, in honor of Walt’s wife, Lillian. This is a tradition that would recur even after Walt’s passing. After a derailment and minor injury to a young patron, Walt had Roger store the engine at the Studio. The Carolwood-Pacific stopped running in 1953.

While the initial plans for Disney World began to take shape after Walt’s passing, Roy wanted to remain as true to his brother’s dreams as the organization could. As Walt has been oft-quoted, he never wanted to do sequels, so there is some discussion as to what kind of theme park would have developed if Walt had lived a few years longer. In the Master Plans for Walt Disney Word there has always been a theme park in the northern part, near Bay Lake. At the Destination D: 40 Years of Adventure event at Walt Disney World in May 2011, Tony Baxter commented on some of the attractions that never were. With archivist Steve Vagnini, Tony shared concept artwork from the late 1960s that detailed a Magic Kingdom with a few different attractions. When the ideas were presented to Roy, he impressed upon the Imagineers that he wanted to honor his brother’s ideas that were so successful at Disneyland.

Howdy, folks. Welcome Aboard the Walt Disney World Railroad.

Roger Broggie is synonymous with the railroads of Disney. As the Vacation Kingdom of the World began to take shape, Roger found himself in charge of designing the transportation system; a similar job he held at Disneyland.  After spending some time in Florida, Roger surmised that the grade of the Florida property could rise up to 2%, which would require a stronger engine than the ones in use at Disneyland. Roger wanted to make a trip to Mexico to “look at some old Baldwins” and he invited Earl Vilmer, the railway builder for Disneyland, to accompany him. One of Roger’s regrets about the trip was not being able to bring landscaper Tony Sepulveda because of his bilingual abilities. Broggie and Vilmer landed in the Yucatan on May 6, 1969. The Mexican Government was selling their steam engines since they were converting to diesel engines1.

The Walter E. Disney2.

Finding the Engines

The first two engines that Broggie and Vilmer picked out were numbers 274 and 275. These engines would eventually become the Walter E. Disney and the Roger E. Broggie. Both engines are 4-4-0 and were made by the Baldwin Locomotive Works. They were originally shipped to the Yucatan in May, 19253.

Railroad engines are classified by their wheel arrangement. The Whyte Notation system is the standard used in the United States and counts the number of leading wheels, the number of drive wheels and the number of trailing wheels. For example, the Walter E. Disney is a 4-6-0 and is known as a ten-wheeler.

Engine 260 was a “Mogul”-type and was manufactured in 1928 by Baldwin. It was a 2-6-0 and would be known as the Lilly Belle. The fourth engine, a 4-4-0 was built in 1916. It would take guests on the Grand Circle Tour as the Roy O. Disney. A fifth engine was purchased but it would not be added to the Magic Kingdom fleet. It was a 2-6-0 built by the Pittsburgh Locomotive Works in 1902. Each of the four engines costs $8,000 each; the Mexican Government sold the fifth one for $750 if Broggie and Vilmer paid to have it moved. When the engine was moved, it was damaged considerably, which may have led to it not being used. Broggie mentions that the Mexican Government threw in “brass bells, whistles, light housings, and other fittings” for free. They had run into a large pile of cast-offs and took as much as they could4.

Bringing the Engines Home

Finishing an engine at the Tampa Bay facility7.

To ship the engines to the Tampa Bay shipyard across the Gulf of Mexico via Mississippi barges turned out to be fairly expensive, even though the trip was only 700 miles. Roger found out that it would cost three times as much to ship over water as opposed to a rail journey of 2000 miles. Two shotgun-armed guards rode with the train until it reached the border5. When the engines reached their destination at the Tampa Ship Repair and Dry Dock Company, they were put under the care of George Britton, a machinist who would eventually become the roundhouse foreman at Walt Disney World. Bob Harpur, who had known Walt Disney in California through model railroading, was hired as the project engineer and he found himself working for Transportation Superintendent Earl Vilmer6.

The Imagineers designed the 20 excursion cars  after the RETLAW 1, the original passenger car at Disneyland.  The cars were built from scratch at the Tampa Shipyard and were designed to load much quicker and easier than their Disneyland counterparts. The excursion cars resemble the Narragansett-style coaches from Disneyland; they are 40 feet long with 15 benches and can carry 75 passengers8.

Transporting an engine to the Magic Kingdom9.
Excursion cars pre-1979 on the Grand Circle Tour10.

Engines in Service

The steam trains were the first attraction completed for the Magic Kingdom. The Lilly Belle was the first engine completed and delivered to the park. The Walter E. Disney, the Lilly Belle and the Roger E. Broggie were all in service on October 1, 1971. The Roy O. Disney started on December, 1, 1971 and the Ward Kimball began service on March 1, 199711. Bill Norred, a railroad equipment collector wanted to buy the five RETLAW 1 coaches that had been in service at Disneyland. Disney Management offered the coaches in return for a Forney-style 0-4-2T built by the Davenport Locomotive Works. Norred had the engine rebuilt as a 2-4-4T. The Disneyland Railroad wanted to use it while the Disneyland engines were being refurbished. Instead, it went to Walt Disney World and was named the Ward Kimball. It was put in use while the Lilly Belle was refurbished12.


*Completely made up statistic. Arguably, it would be five out of five Disney historians.
1Michael Broggie, Walt Disney’s Railroad Story (Virginia Beach, Virginia: Donning Company Publishers,  1998), 317, 319, 320.
2Walt Disney Company, Walt Disney World, (Disney’s Kingdom Editions, 1993), 18.
3Broggie, Walt Disney’s Railroad Story, 320.
4Broggie, Walt Disney’s Railroad Story, 321, 323.
5Broggie, Walt Disney’s Railroad Story, 325.
6Broggie, Walt Disney’s Railroad Story, 327, 329.
7Walt Disney Productions, Walt Disney World: the First Decade (1982), 21.
8Broggie, Walt Disney’s Railroad Story, 331.
9Walt Disney Productions, Walt Disney World: the First Decade, 21.
10Valerie Childs, the Magic of Disneyland and Walt Disney World, (New York City, Mayflower Books, 1979), unpaginated.
11Broggie, Walt Disney’s Railroad Story, 331, 333.
12Broggie, Walt Disney’s Railroad Story, 278.

Skiing with Goofy, Tigger and Pluto

Walt Disney World has offered various forms of entertainment on Seven Seas Lagoon since opening in 1971. Let’s take a closer look at the Magic Kingdom Entertainment Character Ski Team from a 1999 Eyes and Ears.

Who wouldn’t love to see this from the ferryboat as you made your way to the Magic Kingdom early in the morning? Besides, how often do you get to see Tigger in a cowboy hat and Goofy wearing a rain poncho?

The Magic Kingdom Entertainment Department goes above and beyond for guests each summer by featuring the Magic Kingdom Entertainment Character Ski Team

This team splashes its way around the Seven Seas Lagoon for 10 weeks each summer. In the mornings, guests traveling to the Magic Kingdom Park on ferryboats are surprised to see either Goofy, his son Max, Pluto or Tigger skiing by their ferryboat.

“This is where the characters live and play, and that gives [guests] an opportunity to see them,” said Toby Williams, coordinator for the Character Ski Team.

In the afternoon, the team shows up on the shores of Disney’s Grand Floridian Resort and Spa, Disney’s Wilderness Lodge, Disney’s Contemporary Resort and Disney’s Polynesian Resort. They swim and interact with guests at the resort.

“For many guests, it’s the first time they see a character once they get on property,” said Celina Uribe, a Magic Kingdom Entertainment manager.

This team of characters swims in pools, swishes down slides and even shows young guests simple swimming techniques.

When they’re skiing on the water, the team surprises hundreds of guests daily with wake jumps, helicopters and other tricks, such as skiing backward and sitting down on their skis.

The ski team recently ended its summer session for 1999. Cast Members should look for the team to begin entertaining and amazing guests on the Seven Seas Lagoon next summer.

“It’s the only place to see them doing this in the world,” Toby said.

Ryan at the Main Street Gazette has dug up some more tantalizing information about earlier ski shows in Walt Disney World’s history.


October 2011 marked the 40th anniversary of the opening of the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida. The Vacation Kingdom has seen a lot of changes over the past four decades and the editorial staff at Imaginerding wants to celebrate the unique and rich history of the resort with a series of posts. A very special thanks to Celeste Cronrath for designing the series of logos. Make sure to follow her on Twitter.


 

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Walt Disney World’s 40th, the Second Post

I posted the random cell phone pictures from the first few days of my recent trip to Walt Disney World to celebrate the 40th Anniversary. There has been some spectacular coverage on various sites and my group was rather dismayed by the festivities.

This hat really disturbs me. Another attempt to create Walt as a corporate logo and not a man.

After midnight on Main Street USA. Waiting on some fudge!

Meeting two Imagineers (Jason Grandt and Alex Wright). I wrote about seeing them at the D40 event. Meeting them was the second highlight of my trip, but don’t tell them!

Back to Epcot for some random shots.

Beside Captain EO, this ride was a huge hit for my friends.

Anyone want to hazard a guess where this floor is?

I love this view of the Magic Kingdom. Great place to people watch.

Great view of Big Thunder Mountain Railroad.

That’s a heavy shadow being cast.

The next few pictures are from when I was stranded on the Peoplemover with Foxfurr from Passport 2 Dreams for over 25 minutes. We were stopped in the perfect place, but it was the ONLY day I had neglected to bring my camera.

Walking the Peoplemover track after being evacuated. And all I got was a stinking FastPass.

Actual photographic proof that I was evacuated from the Peoplemover. We had to walk along the track and took the stairs between the Indy 500 Speedway and Space Mountain. This was the highlight of the trip!

Here is Foxfurr’s post from twitter:

After this photo was taken George Taylor was struck and killed by an oncoming PeopleMover car RIP 1970-2011

I tried to get some shots from the ferry as we crossed Seven Seas Lagoon. Unfortunately, I am no Tom Bricker. I do like the first one, though.

We did a little theme parkeology at the TTC. This is the remnant of a water fountain.

This is a larger view of the same area. It was obvious that this was a holding pen (there were spots for stanchions) for people waiting to board the ferry. It had been painted within the past few years, if not more recently,

We hit Boma for the last meal. The food was sensational and the hotel was gorgeous. The chef was joking with guests and telling them that the meat was from a zebra!

The last shot of the trip. Anyone want to guess?

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Some Images and Thoughts from the Walt Disney World 40th Anniversary

I will never claim to have the photography skills of Tom and Sarah Bricker from the Disney Tourist Blog, but I wanted to share the random cell phone images that I captured during the 40th Anniversary weekend. Here is the first set of images.

Thursday Evening: Disney’s Hollywood Studios

A dusty tome from our first (of many) trips to the Twilight Zone. I think we rode it  5-6 times.

 

Star Tours: The Adventure Continues was fun. And I was the rebel spy on my very first ride!

 

Yeah, these were adorable.

Friday: Animal Kingdom, Magic Kingdom and Epcot.

We visited three parks on Friday. It was morning  Extra Magic Hour at Animal Kingdom. We did Everest 5 times before park opening.

 

I assume that Rafiki is checking to see if Simba’s diaper if ready for changing.

 

Obviously, it was too early in the morning to be having this much fun. Anyone guess the character on my shirt? (Back row: hubble and forehead. Front row: Montezuma and Sitsdown.)
At the Magic Kingdom in the mid-afternoon. Just an image from a shop.

 

Another detail shot.

 

This pair of fountains was amazing. Loved the tile and the colors.

 

Adventureland is my favorite place in the parks. Beside the Haunted Mansion, that is.

 

We made it to Epcot. Our first stop was the restrooms. Took a moment to snap the ubiquitous Spaceship Earth photo.

 

Wow. Michael Crawford from Progress City, USA was right: school bread from Norway is AMAZING!

 

Just a quick photo. The fall skies in Orlando are breathtaking.

 

TOTORO! Who wouldn’t want a Totoro hand towel?

 

We didn’t do this. If it wasn’t a thrill ride, we kept on walking. I couldn’t help but laugh at the absurdity of this sign.

 

At first, it was just a picture of my beer. Then I noticed the reflection.

 

Hmmm. Not a good composition.

 

A little better. At least you can tell that I was at Epcot.

 

Much better! Wait a minute. Why am I taking photos of my beer when I should be drinking it?

 

I must get a copy of this book!

 

Some Saki at Teppen Edo.

 

I started off with the kid’s chopsticks but quickly realized that I would starve if I didn’t switch to a fork.

 

Mai, our chef. She wasn’t as blurry in real life. That must have been the Saki.

 

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Sixth Annual Village Wine Festival!

Before the Epcot Food and Wine Festival, there was a much smaller event being held at the Village that originated the current, month-long celebration. 

The Village Wine Festival started in 1979 and was an annual event by 1982. At some point in its history, the festival moved from the Village Spirits and Vintage Cellar to the Conference Center, as noted in the following article from 1987.

Village Wine FestivalThe sixth annual Village Wine Festival will be held at the Conference Center February 5-8. This festival, which has become Florida’s premier fine wine forum, will showcase more than 100 premium wines from six wineries. The festival kicks off with the elaborate Winemakers’ Reception on February 5, Grand Tastings on February 6-8, and two wine seminars on February 7 and 8. For more information and to make your reservation call 827-7200. Grand tasting tickets can also be purchased at Village Guest Services and Village Spirits/ (Sorry, no castmember discount on Wine Festival tickets.)

Foxxfur at Passport 2 Dreams has posted many fantastic articles about the Village. See the Village Tonight, Part Two mentions the beginnings of two Epcot traditions.

And Now For Something Completely Different!
The second part of the article on the Village details a two-day program on how to salvage treasure!

Artespana, sponsored by Arriba Brothers, is also celebrating their first anniversary with a very unique offering. On February 12 and 13, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Captain Carl Fismer of the Spanish Main Treasure Company, will be discussing the art of treasure salvaging. Artifacts, weapons, cannons, and ship equipment from 16th – 18th century Spanish fleets will be displayed and authentic Spanish treasure will be available for purchase with prices ranging from $5 to $8,000. A certificate of authenticity, signed by Captain Fismer, will be included with each purchase.


October 2011 marks the 40th anniversary of the opening of the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida. The Vacation Kingdom has seen a lot of changes over the past four decades and the editorial staff at Imaginerding wants to celebrate the unique and rich history of the resort with a series of posts


A very special thanks to Celeste Cronrath for designing the series of logos for our posts. Make sure to follow her on Twitter
 


Don’t forget to stop by our site and leave some Disney Geek love!

http://www.imaginerding.com

Disney’s Treehouse Villas, Then and Now

The Treehouse Villas at Saratoga Springs have a storied history at Walt Disney World. By the time the 60 villas were finished in 1975, Disney had already changed plans for the Lake Buena Vista Resort Community. One of the first major refurbishments took place in 1987. Let’s take a look!

The Treehouse Villas located in Lake Buena Vista are in the midst of major remodeling. Rich mauve and blue colors have replaced the dark earth tones making the Treehouses bright and airy. 

Each Villa is being updated with new furniture, carpet, wallpaper and paint. The downstains sitting room is now being turned into a third bedroom creating comfortable sleeping room for up to six people in each unit.

The outside of the Treehouses are also getting new paint. The outside color scheme was selected to blend each Villa in with its surrounding area creating a secluded, peaceful atmosphere. 

More than halfway finished. the Treehouse Villas are scheduled for remodeling completion by March. Our guests have shown great enthusiasm for our newly refurbished Treehouses. 

Our guests have shown great enthusiasm for our newly refurbished Treehouses. 

Returning guests have voiced an appreciation for the fresh change and look forward to returning again.

 

The following photo is from 2006. You can see the skeleton of the 1987 remodel but they have replaced the furniture. It was used to house International College Program students before the 2009 remodels.

http://df82.blogspot.com/2009/02/living-in-tree.html

Fee from DF’82 posted pictures from a 2006 stay at the Treehouse Villas when she was a castmember.

Michael Crawford from Progress City USA offers a fantastic article on the Treehouse Villas refurbishment from 2009. What is interesting to note is that this rendering does not have any angular kids. Maybe they are in the bedroom or playing outside.

 

A promotional postcard with the concept artwork was mailed out to Disney Vacation Club members. I love the wildlife. The squirrel and birds are just waiting for the family to leave. I can’t tell from the scan if that is Chet’s or Roman’s family having the picnic?


October 2011 marks the 40th anniversary of the opening of the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida. The Vacation Kingdom has seen a lot of changes over the past four decades and the editorial staff at Imaginerding wants to celebrate the unique and rich history of the resort with a series of posts. 

A very special thanks to Celeste Cronrath for designing the series of logos for our posts. Make sure to follow her on Twitter.

 


Don’t forget to stop by our site and leave some Disney Geek love!

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Jobs at Walt Disney World

The following are a sample of a few jobs from the first year of Walt Disney World’s history. The February, 1972, Eyes & Ears showcases four different positions at the Vacation Kingdom of the World. Surprisingly, two of the jobs dealt with the advanced technologies that the Company was eager showcase on its march to EPCOT Center. Which job would you choose?

 Nick Mickle (left) and Al Sasko man our Vacation Kingdom Central Communications Center where operators page and communicate with divisions om five separate channels. Direct lines have also been established for emergency contact wit hthe Reedy Creek Fire Department, First Aid and Orange Vista Hospital.

 Don’t let anyone tell you cats and dogs are the only residents at our Kal Kan Kennel Club. Linda Kugele, a native of San Diego, California, greets a more unusual visitor—a squirrel monkey. Linda tells us recent guests include snakes, crabs, and even a tarantula!

Ever wonder where the “information” comes from? Patty Conway (left) and Rhonda Hager are just two of many guest relations Hostesses who answer 14 incoming lines from guests and employees. The girls answer almost 4,000 questions a week ranging from babysitting to fireworks. Need an answer? Dial 4500!

Meet Bill Binson of our Vista Florida Telephone System who recently started work on several “junctor ring control bays.” Controlling the ring on all Vacation Kingdom telephones, each of the new units will service 1,000 telephones. Expansion of the present system is expected to take several weeks.

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Theme Parkeology: Universe of Energy 1985!

Theme Parkeology: Universe of Energy 1985

According to Dictionary.com, the term vintage, when used as an adjective, means “lasting interest and importance; venerable; classic.” So, when does something become vintage? In the life of a theme park (beginning with Santa Claus Land in 1946), what constitutes vintage? 15 or 20 years? Or when an attraction or area has gone through several iterations and is recognizably different.

Suffice it to say, the image above, from summer 1985, can be considered vintage EPCOT Center.

Let’s take a closer look at the photograph for some of the finer details. Right way, you notice the old-style Universe of Energy sign with the Exxon sponsorship. The sign was changed in 2001 to reflect the merger of the sponsor ExxonMobil. In 2004, the sponsorship ended. The retaining wall around the sign was also painted a deep blue during the 1996 refurbishment and conversion to Ellen’s Energy Adventure.

This is a good angle of the show building because you can see the original paint scheme which was changed to a rainbow patter from 1996-2009. The current paint scheme is more reminiscent of the original version.

Check out all of those strollers!

This is a great shot of all of the strollers from the early days of EPCOT CENTER. Especially since you can see that the seat lowers. This is to allow the child to sleep or as a quick escape route for the kids when they realized that there are no characters at EPCOT Center! Notice the hanging tags on the handle bars? Could it be a rash of Minnie Pearl’s grandkids? More likely it is the rental slip or name tag for the family.

Our next stop is to the right of the building next to the entrance. (Sometime after the refurbishment, the entrance was moved to the other side.) Notice the box-shaped trees and how they reflect the outline of the pavilion? Notice the funny spot above the last tree? Proof that aliens exist! And they visited EPCOT Center. I bet they loved Horizon!

Here is a shot of the queue from an earlier post.


October 2011 marks the 40th anniversary of the opening of the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida. The Vacation Kingdom has seen a lot of changes over the past four decades and the editorial staff at Imaginerding wants to celebrate the unique and rich history of the resort with a series of posts

A very special thanks to Celeste Cronrath for designing the series of logos for our posts. Make sure to follow her on Twitter


 Looking for a great book on EPCOT Center?

Imagineering the Magic Kingdom Concept Art Part Two

October 2011 marks the 40th anniversary of the opening of the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida. The Vacation Kingdom has seen a lot of changes over the past four decades and the editorial staff at Imaginerding wants to celebrate the unique and rich history of the resort with a series of posts. 

A very special thanks to Celeste Cronrath for designing the series of logos for our posts. Make sure to follow her on Twitter.

 


When I reviewed the two-disc DVD Magic Kingdom: Imagineering the Magic, I mentioned the Imagineering Art Gallery on the second disc. There are 42 images, in all, and I wanted to share some of my favorite shots. A few of them have been featured in the Art of Walt Disney World by Jeff Kurtti and Bruce Gordon. Some of them I had not seen before.

I would attribute a few of these to Dorothea Redmond. Any ideas?

You can see the post with other images here.

A great shot of Frontierland. It is hard to see, but it does say “BEAR BAND” on the marquee.

 

A view of the riverfront, pre-Splash Mountain. Notice the Frontierland Station and a town square with a flag pole.

 

A fairly uncluttered view of Tom Sawyer Island. Strange to see it without Big Thunder Mountain Railroad looming over it.

 

A gorgeous rendering of the chalet for the Skyway to Tomorrowland. I do believe that the lady is eating an ice cream and the gentleman has his camera ready.

 

A futuristic view of Tomorrowland. A covered Peoplemover and water. What else do you need to proclaim the future! Based on the separate exits and entrance, I assume that this is a design for a Circle Vision building. Any thoughts?

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Decorate Your Kitchen With Mickey Mouse: Celebrating 40 Years of Walt Disney World History

You never know what kind of oddities that you will find when you deal with Disney-related collectibles. Whether it is a guidebook that comes with a fantastic bag or a Tar Heel Bread button that leads you to an in-store giveaway that is believed to be the first use of a cartoon character to sell food. There is always something interesting that leads you down a path you never expected or turns over new information about one of our favorite theme parks.

Cooking with Mickey around Our World was the first, official compilation of recipes from Walt Disney World. Published in 1986, it offers a great mix of recipes from restaurants all over the Vacation Kingdom of the World. Beverages, appetizers, soups. breads, salads, seafood, poultry, meats, vegetables, desserts and sauces make up the bulk of the offerings. As I mentioned in the review of Thought You’d Never Ask, Part Two, recipe books are a great way to trace the history of restaurants and food offerings at Walt Disney World.

In all, 57 different restaurants are covered through 292 pages. Did you know that they served Chili and Beans at two different places at Walt Disney World? You could find this delectable dish at the Campfire Snack Bar at Fort Wilderness and at the Fiesta Fun Center at the Contemporary Resort. Unfortunately, both locations are now gone. The Fiesta fun Center was renamed the Food and Fun Center and then demolished, so to speak, to create The Wave. The Campfire Snack Bar was converted into Crocket’s Tavern in 1986. Now, it mostly serves pizza and beer.

The author’s first sampling of the amazing Chili and Beans at Trail’s End Restaurant at Fort Wilderness. Witnesses in attendance: Michael Crawford from Progress City, USA and Foxxfur from Passport 2 Dreams.

On its own merits, Cooking With Mickey Around Our World is a must-have resource for the Disney historian and foodie. The surprise waits at the end of the book under the section entitled Merchandise Mail Order. Remember the days before the Disney Store (where did they all go?) and before each ride ended in a homogenized gift shop? If you do, then you might remember having to call MOM, the Mail Order Merchandise Department. Back in the day, MOM was the only way to order Disney-related merchandise when not in the parks. Besides cookware, you could order almost anything from the parks through Mail Order Merchandising.

I love the design of this page. They use the Walt Disney World “D” in the word Order. And Mickey looks like he just had a haircut, er, earcut; the ears just don’t have the right ratio. But take a look at the two-page, full-color spread. Imagine decking out your kitchen with a few of these trinkets!

Click on me for a larger version!

Dinnerware, Top quality plastic, top rack dishwasher safe. Yeah, that’s high quality. I wouldn’t mind having the WDW Character sectional plate, character mug, character cereal bowl and character tumbler, though!


October 2011 marks the 40th anniversary of the opening of the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida. The Vacation Kingdom has seen a lot of changes over the past four decades and the editorial staff at Imaginerding wants to celebrate the unique and rich history of the resort with a series of posts


A very special thanks to Celeste Cronrath for designing the series of logos for our posts. Make sure to follow her on Twitter
 



Don’t forget to stop by our site and leave some Disney Geek love!

http://www.imaginerding.com